Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow + Giveaway

 

24879132Published: August 30th 2016

Publisher: Delacorte Press

Genres: YA, Contemporary, Mental Health

Format: ARC Source: First In Line

My Rating: 5stars-600x201

Charlotte Davis is in pieces. At seventeen she’s already lost more than most people lose in a lifetime. But she’s learned how to forget. The thick glass of a mason jar cuts deep, and the pain washes away the sorrow until there is nothing but calm. You don’t have to think about your father and the river. Your best friend, who is gone forever. Or your mother, who has nothing left to give you.

Every new scar hardens Charlie’s heart just a little more, yet it still hurts so much. It hurts enough to not care anymore, which is sometimes what has to happen before you can find your way back from the edge.

Add To Goodreads

~Review~

embed (10)

I’ll start by saying that this book may be a trigger for some readers. There’s no shortage of issues in this book, so read at your own risk. It’s dark and gritty, and not what I thought going into it.

It took me roughly 2 days to get through Girl In Pieces. It’s a very heavily issued story; ranging from self harm, abuse, eating disorders, rape, etc… Our main character Charlie, along with side characters, are living in hell. There’s no other way to describe it. Life is tough, but this just felt like too much for anyone to go through. Yet, this is happening all over the world. I love that the author doesn’t gloss over the UGLY. There’s plenty of it to go around.

Charlie’s stream of consciousness is very sad. We get lucid thoughts and actions from her, but her fragmented thoughts also drove the story forward. Those chapters are short, which made the story progress even faster; even though you want to savor every little detail. My favorite parts in the beginning are her interactions with the other girls in the psych hospital. There’s her roommate Louisa, whom is also a cutter. Then there’s Blue, who has quite a mouth on her. She likes to antagonize Charlie, to make her talk. Charlie doesn’t talk the first few weeks that she’s there, but when she starts admitting to herself that she wants to get better and try to move on from what put her there, she finally speaks. Her fears and pain were so very real, and the way that the author characterized self harm in this story is really eye-opening. There were moments when I thought that I needed to just put the book down for a moment. 

The second half of the story is Charlie trying to put her life back together after she’s discharged. It was very hard. Just when I was thinking that life for Charlie was going to be all rainbows and sunshine, here comes an asshole. More than that, though, is Charlie’s craving for normal. She wants her life back the way it was before her dad died. She misses her best friend, Ellis’, touch. She wants Mikey to love her like he loves Ellis. It was just all written so boldly, and I admire the author for that. 

I highly recommend this book. It’s not just about cutting. Please don’t think that it’s all about cutting. 

 

~Giveaway~

I ended up with 2 ARCs of Girl In Pieces, so I feel it is my duty to share this story with one of you lucky readers. To enter, just fill out the Rafflecopter form. This giveaway is US only. Sorry INT readers. I will have a giveaway for you guys soon.

  • must be a US resident
  • must be 13 years or older
  • winner will have 48 hrs. to reply to my email, or another winner will be chosen
  • Ends 9/7

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Review: Forged By Fire by Sharon M. Draper

119832Release Date: January 1st 1997

Publisher: Simon Pulse

Series: Hazelwood High #2

Reviewed In Series: Tears of a Tiger

Genres: Young-Adult/Contemporary/Realistic-Fiction/African-American/Cultural/Drama

Format: Paperback

Source: Purchased

My Rating: 4 Stars

Find It: Goodreads | Amazon | B&N

When Gerald was a child he was fascinated by fire. But fire is dangerous and powerful, and tragedy strikes. His substance-addicted mother is taken from him. Then he loses the loving generosity of a favorite aunt. A brutal stepfather with a flaming temper and an evil secret makes his life miserable. The one bright light in Gerald’s life is his little half sister, Angel, whom he struggles to protect from her father, Jordan Sparks, who abuses her, and from their mother, whose irresponsible behavior forces Gerald to work hard to keep the family together. As a teenager, Gerald finds success as a member of the Hazelwood Tigers basketball team, while Angel develops her talents as a dancer. Trouble still haunts them, however, and Gerald learns, painfully, that young friends can die and old enemies must be faced. In the end he must stand up to his stepfather alone in a blazing confrontation.

Read More »

DNF Review: Daughters of the Dragon by Bill Andrews


20765579Release Date: 
February 1st 2014

Publisher: Madhouse Press

Genre: Historical Fiction

Format: ebook

Source: copy provided by author

icon_goodreads_32Amazon-icondf05a-bn

 

DURING WORLD WAR II, the Japanese forced 200,000 young Korean women to be sex slaves or “comfort women” for their soldiers. This is one woman’s riveting story of strength, courage and promises kept.

In 1943, the Japanese tear young Ja-hee and her sister from their peaceful family farm to be comfort women for the Imperial Army. Before they leave home, their mother gives them a magnificent antique comb with an ivory inlay of a two-headed dragon, saying it will protect them. The sisters suffer terribly at the hands of the Japanese, and by the end of the war, Ja-hee must flee while her sister lies dying. Ja-hee keeps her time as a comfort woman a secret while she struggles to rebuild her life. She meets a man in North Korea who shows her what true love is. But the communists take him away in the middle of the night, and she escapes to the South. There, she finally finds success as the country rebuilds after the Korean War. However when her terrible secret is revealed, she’s thrown into poverty. In the depths of despair, she’s tempted to sell the comb with the two-headed dragon that she believes has no magic for her. Then one day she discovers its true meaning and her surprising heredity. And now she must find the only person who can carry on the legacy of the two-headed dragon… someone she abandoned years ago.

Set within the tumultuous backdrop of 20th century Korea, Daughters of the Dragon by award-winning author William Andrews will make you cry and cheer for Ja-hee. And in the end, you’ll have a better understanding of the Land of the Morning Calm.

Daughters of the Dragon is inspired by The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini, Memiors of a Geisha by Arthur Golden, the books of Amy Tan and Lisa See.

images (6)

First off, my decision to not finish this book shouldn’t hinder anyone from reading it themselves. I love historical fiction. I, however, could not get into this story no matter how hard I tried. In a month’s time, I only read 75 pages. Don’t get me wrong, I wouldn’t say that it’s a boring read. I just could not keep reading this book without getting angry. This is me trying to brave past my own personal demons, but I just couldn’t do it. 

It started out with a young Korean-American woman, dealing with the death of her adoptive mother, and her going to Korea to meet her birth mother. Mind you, she never really cared about meeting her until recently, so she and her adoptive father travel to meet the woman who gave her life. When she arrives at the place to meet her, she is informed that her birth mother passed away, and she wants to know why that information wasn’t provided before she flew all those miles to meet her. As she is leaving, she is accosted by an older Korean woman who gives her a package and a cryptic message to meet the following day, alone. From there, I gathered who the mystery woman is and the beginning of a long and painful story that lies behind an old family heirloom. As the story slowly unfolded, I just could not go any further. It was too much to take, and I tried daily to keep reading but failed miserably. 

I have no clue how the rest of this story played out. I’m hoping sometime in the near future that I will be able to sit down and finish this book. Don’t let my thoughts keep you from this story. Everyone has different reactions to stories, mine just happened to be a negative one that has no bearing on the rest of this book. If you enjoy historical fiction then I say go for it. There are a myriad of Korean and Japanese proverbs within just those 75 pages that I read, so that was insightful. As I didn’t finish this book, I can’t rate it appropriately.