{Review} Rags & Bones: New Twists on Timeless Tales

17310066Authors: Melissa Marr, Tim Pratt, Neil Gaiman, Carrie Ryan, Gene Wolfe, Kelly Armstrong, Rick Yancey, Kami Garcia, Holly Black, Garth Nix, Margaret Stohl, Saladin Ahmed

Published: October 22nd 2013

Publisher: Little Brown Books for Young Readers

Genres: Young-Adult/  Fairy Tale/ Retellings/ Short Stories/ Anthology/ Classic/ Fantasy/ Paranormal

Format: Hardcover

Source: Won

My Rating: 4 Stars

Find It: Goodreads | Amazon | B&N

From Sir Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queen to E.M. Forster’s “The Machine Stops,” literature is filled with sexy, deadly, and downright twisted tales. In this collection, award-winning and bestselling authors reimagine their favorite classic stories, the ones that have inspired, awed, and enraged them, the ones that have become ingrained in modern culture, and the ones that have been too long overlooked. They take these stories and boil them down to their bones, and then reassemble them for a new generation of young adult readers.

Written from a twenty-first century perspective and set within the realms of science fiction, dystopian fiction, fantasy and realistic fiction, these short stories are as moving and thought provoking as their originators. They pay homage to groundbreaking literary achievements of the past while celebrating each author’s unique perception and innovative style.

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Blog Tour + Giveaway: The Tree of Water by Elizabeth Haydon #TheTreeOfWaterTour @torteen @torbooks @PRbytheBook

Welcome To my stop on The Tree of Water blog tour. Today I have a great Q&A and excerpt to share with you all. Also, don’t forget to enter the awesome giveaway at the bottom before you leave!

Tree of WaterTitle: The Tree of Water

Series: The Lost Journals of Ven Polypheme #4

Author: Elizabeth Haydon

Publisher: Starscape/ Tor Books

Genres: Middle Grade/ Teen
Fantasy

Find It: Goodreads | Amazon | B&N 

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Interview with Elizabeth Haydon,

documentarian, archanologist and translator of Ven’s

journals, including The Tree of Water

 

  • Dr. Haydon, can you give us a brief summary of The Tree of Water?

 

Certainly. Ven Polypheme, who wrote the, er, Lost Journals of Ven Polypheme, lived long ago in the Second Age of history, when magic was much more alive and visible in the world than it is now. His journals are very important finds, because they tell the story of ancient magic and where it still may be found in the world today.

In the first three journals we saw how Ven came to the mystical island of Serendair and was given the job of Royal Reporter by the king of the island, a young man named Vandemere. The Royal Reporter was supposed to find magic that was hiding in plain sight in the world and report back about it to the king. As you can imagine, this could be a fun but dangerous job, and at the beginning of The Tree of Water, we see that Ven and his friends are hiding from the evil Thief Queen, who is looking to find and kill him.

Amariel, a merrow [humans call these ‘mermaids,’ but we know that’s the wrong word] who saved Ven when the first ship he sailed on sank, has been asking Ven to come and explore the wonders of the Deep, her world in the sea. Deciding that this could be a great way to find hidden magic as well as hide from the evil Thief Queen, Ven and his best friend, Char, follow her into the Deep. The sea, as you know, is one of the most magical places in the world—but sometimes that magic, and that place, can be deadly.

The book tells of mysterious places, and interesting creatures, and wondrous things that have never been seen in the dry world, and tales from the very bottom of the sea.

 

 

  • The main character in The Lost Journals of Ven Polypheme series is Charles Magnus “Ven” Polypheme. Tell us about him.

 

Ven was an interesting person, but he really didn’t think so. He and his family were of a different race than the humans who made up most of the population where he lived, the race of the Nain. Nain are an old race, a little shorter and stockier than most humans, with a tendency to be on the grumpy side. They live about four times as long as humans, are very proud of their beards, which they believe tell their life stories, don’t like to swim or travel, and prefer to live deep in the mountains.

Ven was nothing like the majority of Nain. He was very curious, loved to travel, could swim, and longed to see the world. He was actually a pretty nice kid most of the time. He had the equivalent of a baby face because only three whiskers of his beard had grown in by the time The Tree of Water took place, when he was fifty years old [around twelve in Nain years]. He had a great group of friends, including the merrow and Char, who were mentioned earlier. It is believed that his journals were the original research documents for two of the most important books of all time, The Book of All Human Knowledge and All the World’s Magic. The only copies of these two volumes were lost at sea centuries ago, so finding the Lost Journals is the only way to recover this important information.

 

 

  • What kind of research do you do for the series?

 

I go to places where Ven went and try to find relics he left behind. Usually this is with an expedition of archaeologists and historians. I am an expert in ancient magic [an archanologist] so I don’t usually lead the expeditions, I’m just a consultant. It gives me the chance to learn a lot about magic and lets me work on my suntan at the same time, so it’s good.

 

 

  • What is/are the most difficult part or parts of writing/restoring the Lost Journals?

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